The land management policy of the Soviet state in Kazakhstan in the 1920s-1930s (based on materials from the Irtysh region)


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DOI:

https://doi.org/10.32523/2616-7255-2023-145-4-128-141

Keywords:

Кеңес үкіметі; жерге орналастыру; жер нормасы; реформа; тәркілеу; ауыл шаруашылығы

Abstract

This article delves into Soviet land policy and land regulation, focusing on the 1920-1930s. It aims to clarify land use standards in the Irtysh region and analyze land assessment processes, structure, and outcomes. The study also addresses overlooked aspects like class-based conflicts and local disputes over land during development. The primary information source is the Documentation Center for Contemporary History of the Abay Region. It augments historical analysis of land matters, social dynamics, and intercultural interactions with unpublished data. Since 1926, Kazakhstan has been a sought-after resettlement destination, akin to the Russian Empire era. The Irtysh region was a key area for seeking additional land resources. This involved lowering norms for livestock farming, and reallocating surplus lands for agricultural growth and population relocation. The Soviet government sought to rectify the disparities in colonial land policy from the Russian Empire era. Initial attempts were made to grant land to those liberated from colonial oppression and to set land regulations while assessing available resources. However, it was later recognized that these measures were not effectively carried out. In particular, the implementation of land reform in the Irtysh region encountered difficulties and advanced unevenly.

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Published

2023-12-06

How to Cite

Oralbekova А. А. ., Abenova Г. А. ., & Botabekova А. Р. . (2023). The land management policy of the Soviet state in Kazakhstan in the 1920s-1930s (based on materials from the Irtysh region). Bulletin of L.N. Gumilyov Eurasian National University. Historical Sciences. Philosophy. Religious Studies Series., 145(4), 128–141. https://doi.org/10.32523/2616-7255-2023-145-4-128-141

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Section

Historical Sciences